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Notes From The Nurse
Nora Diversi
Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Pertussis

We have had a 3rd reported case of Pertussis or Whooping Cough at the high school since school started this year. 

  • The first signs of Pertussis are similar to a cold (runny nose, low-grade fever, sneezing and a cough). After 1-2 weeks the signs include uncontrollable cough, high pitched whooping sound, vomiting after coughing and exhaustion.
  • Pertussis is spread from person to person through the air and is treated with antibiotics. Pertussis can be serious especially in infants and the elderly.
  • There is a vaccine for Pertussis. The booster is called Tdap and is recommended for preteens and teens. Please speak to your health care provider to make sure your child is up to date on their vaccinations. 
  • For more information about Pertussis go to https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/...
  • Please contact a medical provider if your child has signs of Pertussis.

Influenza

This is also a good time to be planning Flu vaccinations for your family. Influenza is a serious contagious respiratory illness marked be fever, chills, sore throat, body/muscle aches, headache and fatigue. Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently, but millions of people get the flu every year. Even healthy people can get very sick from the flu and spread it to others. 

Vaccinations are the best way to prevent both Pertussis and Influenza.  Other ways to help prevent illness include: frequent hand washing, covering your cough, staying home when you are sick, getting plenty of rest and eating a healthy diet.

Please call 582-3150 with questions or concerns.